Both vocally and rhythmically they developed a “sauce” of Caribbean music

Both vocally and rhythmically they developed a “sauce” of Caribbean music

Puerto Rico have its very own traditions of “bomba” and “plena”, to which percussionist Rafael Cortijo, chief of a conjunto since 1954, had put trumpets and saxophones (El Bombon De Elena). Their conjunto with his husky vocalist Ismael Rivera (El Nazareno, Quitate de la thru Perico), well known when it comes down to improvised call-and-response vocals regarding the “sonero” tradition, harked back again to the African sources of Caribbean audio without any distinction between styles. El enorme combination, developed by pianist Rafael Ithier, proceeded Cortijo’s purpose in a lighter vein, with La Muerte (1962) and Ojos Chinos (1964).

In Puerto Rico salsa can generally “guaguanco”, a term that initially referred to a kind of rumba dance

During the 1960s, the bomba-son crossbreed hit the Puertorican nest in nyc. Right here, the daughter adopted the structure with the large band, as in Jimmy Sabater’s Salsa y Bembe (1962) and vibraphonist Cal Tjader’s Salsa del Alma (1964).

The Cuban expatriates that moved in ny provided greatly toward absorption in the genre when you look at the American traditions: vocalist Celia Cruz (Burundanaga, 1956; Yerbero Moderno, 1956), flutist Jose-Antonio Fajardo (La Charanga), flashy congueros Candido Camero and Ramon “Mongo” Santamaria (Mazacote, 1958; Afro azure, 1959; Herbie Hancock’s Watermelon people, 1963), violinist Felix “Pupi” Legarreta, whom fused charanga and jazz on Salsa aria, which found its way to nyc in 1950, settled tribute to his Cuban sources on Yambu (1958) and Mongo (1959), that were done with other Latin percussionists.